APRIL FOOLS: THE ORIGIN

It's April Fools today everyone from an adult to a kid finds ways to prank other people and have a laugh out of it. Even though it is not a holiday or a festival, it does spread laughter around the faces of many people today. Lets find out how this idea of April Fools started and how you can prank your friends and family harmlessly yet funny.



There’s no question that April Fools’ Day is one of the most widely recognized non-religious holidays in the Western world. Children prank parents, coworkers prank coworkers, and yes, national news outlets still prank their readers. But why? What is the origin of April Fools’ Day, and how did it become an international phenomenon? The totally legit, not-pulling-your-leg answer to the origin of April Fools’ Day is: Nobody really knows. April Fools’ Day is apparently an ancient enough tradition that the earliest recorded mentions, including the following excerpt from a 1708 letter to Britain’s Apollo magazine, ask the same question we do: “Whence proceeds the custom of making April Fools?”


One likely predecessor to the origin of April Fools’ day is the Roman tradition of Hilaria, a spring festival held around March 25 in honour of the “first day of the year longer than the night” (to us, the vernal equinox, which typically falls on March 20). Festivities included games, processions, and masquerades, during which disguised commoners could imitate nobility to devious ends.


It’s hard to say whether this ancient revelry’s similarities to modern April Fools’ Day are legit or coincidence, as the first recorded mentions of the holiday didn’t appear until several hundred years later.



There are variations between countries in the celebration of April Fools’ Day, but all have in common an excuse to make someone play the fool. In France, for example, the fooled person is called Poisson d’avril (“April fish”), perhaps in reference to a young fish and hence to one that is easily caught; it is common for French children to pin a paper fish to the backs of unsuspecting friends. In Scotland, the day is Gowkie Day, for the gowk, or cuckoo, is a symbol of the fool; on the following day signs reading “kick me” are pinned to friends’ backs. In many countries newspapers and the other media participate—for example, with false headlines or news stories.




Best April Fools Pranks:

Uncontrollable Remote: This prank takes the “control” out of remote control: Use a teeny sticker or tape to cover over the sensor on the clicker. No matter how hard they try, they won’t be able to make those TV channels budge … even with new batteries.

  • Rubber Band Barrier: Take some time to wrap one of their most essential objects — like the remote control or their smartphone — with layers upon layers of rubber bands. Then watch them try to remain patient long enough to free it.




  • Sticky Situation: This prank’s on the messier side, but it’s super easy to execute: Swap the clear disinfectant within a container of sanitiser for clear school glue instead. They’ll pump out a sticky surprise right into their hands … and wonder why it’s not evaporating as they rub.

  • Fake and “oops!”: Squeeze glue into an old bottle of nail polish, shake it up, and spill it out on parchment paper with the glue streaming from the bottle. When it dries, put it on the carpet to make your target think they have a troublesome mess on their hands.

  • The Best Prank (Scroll Down)
























HAPPY APRIL FOOLS!!! : Thank you for taking the time and scrolling down all the way... Have a great laugh.



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